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Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of Moll Flanders and what it means

Language used as a defense in moll flanders by daniel …

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Moll Flanders Parts 1-3 Summary and Analysis | GradeSaver
Larry L. Langford, "Retelling Moll's Story: The Editor's Preface to Moll Flanders," JNT22, 3 (Fall 1992): 164-79, 165. Langford is the one critic who foregrounds the preface and the role of the editor. My analysis differs from Langford's in my emphasis upon incest and understanding of the editor's and reader's figurative roles.

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0. Brown, "The Displaced Self in the Novels of Daniel Defoe," ELH 38, 4 (Winter 197 1): 562-90, 584, who calls Defoe's novels books "whose arnbigu- ity is deep, thorough, and finally unresolvable." See Michael M. Boardman, Defoe and the Uses of Narrative (New Brunswick NJ: Rutgers Univ. Press, 1983); and Ian Watt, "Defoe as Novelist," in Moll Flanders, pp. 351-61 for grammatical explanations of this irresolvability. Also, see Maximillian E. Novak, "Defoe's 'Indifferent Monitor': The Complexity of Moll Flanders," ECS 3, 3 (Spring 1970): 351-65; and G. A. Starr, Defoe and Casuistry (Princeton: Princeton Univ. Press, 1971) for diction.

 

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Moll Flanders Daniel Defoe (1660-1731) Novelist, journalist and entrepreneur. Probably the most versatile journalist of his time and a prolific writer - over


Digital Defoe: Studies in Defoe & His Contemporaries 3, no. 1 (fall 2011) ISSN 1948-1802 Daniel Defoe, Moll Flanders. Ed. G.A. Starr and Linda Bree.


Reading and Righting "Moll Flanders" | Thomas Grant …

Moll Flanders By Daniel Defoe . 2 Chapter 1: THE AUTHOR'S PREFACE The world is so taken up of late with novels and romances, that it will be hard for a private history to be taken for genuine, where the names and

Moll Flanders is one of the earliest examples of a novel

MIASMA (Greek, "stench"): Literally referring to a stench or bad smell, the Greek term also metaphorically indicates a sort of ceremonial taint or spiritual stain that can result from various sorts of impurity. The ancient Greeks thought actions such as murder, incest, blasphemy, menstruation, or violations of might cause a miasma around a person or place, and until the community took action to expunge the stain, misfortune such as disease, drought, or other blights would be the potential result. Normally, people thought to be stained by miasma were forbidden to pass the sacred marker () separating the holy ground of a temple or a public forum from non-sacred space. The term is particularly applicable in the play Oedipus Rex, in which the entire community of Thebes has fallen under a curse because of a miasma in their midst. It is also relevant in Agamemnon, where the prophetess Cassandra seems to have the ability to sense miasma as well as see the invisible that have come to settle on the house.

Moll Flanders _ Study, Summary and Analysis | …

The connection between the rules that govern kinship and grammar offers a critical reader of Moll Flanders a tool to under- stand the connection between the troubling presence of incest and the renowned problem of language in the novel.' Kinship and language are most tangled in the preface, a part of the text that, with few significant exceptions, has been treated as little more than an interesting addendum to the body of the novel. However, within the preface the character of the editor attempts to situate the novel's characters, readers, and text itself in a re- cuperative family dynamic that undoes the familial and linguistic "bad grammar" that appears throughout the novel. By exploring these efforts and failures, I extend and re-craft the traditional critical problems and arguments regarding irony and voice; the force of my argument coincides with the assertion that incest informs the (mis)use of language and that language constructs incest.

Moll; Flanders, Plain of; Flanders, ..

tion the editor performs that must be understood loosely as male and specifically as paternalistic. These qualities are consistently revealed by the editor's rhetoric: he rewrites Moll's "own memo- randums" (p. 1)and has "had no little difficulty to put it into a Dress fit to be seen, and to make it speak Language fit to be read"