• That's it.
  • And breathe in.

The youngboy and his brother line up for a photograph PHOTOGRAPHER Okay, put your arm around your brother.

The young boy blinks as the flash goes off.

An old man lights a single candle.

A teacher goes over the oldman's duties.
18 Paul, having remained many days longer, took leave of the brethren and put out to sea for Syria, and with him were Priscilla and Aquila. In Cenchrea he had his hair cut, for he was keeping a vow. 19 They came to Ephesus, and he left them there. Now he himself entered the synagogue and reasoned with the Jews. 20 When they asked him to stay for a longer time, he did not consent, 21 but taking leave of them and saying, "I will return to you again if God wills," he set sail from Ephesus.22 When he had landed at Caesarea, he went up and greeted the church, and went down to Antioch.

MAN All right boys, let's settle down.

At that point he will indicate to you to light the candles of the boys.
"In 1748 Thomson had felt it necessary to include this word ('a Piece of Land, or Meadow') in the list of 'obsolete Words' at the end of The Castle of Indolence."

 

The boys hoist the banners and the bagpipes begin to play loudly.

The various boys, including NEIL, KNOX, and CAMERON, line up holdingbanners.
"This is a bit of the quiet scenery so dear to the hearts of the early Romanticists; and in the next stanza we have the inevitable owl in the moonlight. The scenery as well as the meditations of the Elegy were by no means original; they simply established more firmly literary fashions which were already fast becoming popular."


"And here may be the best place to note after Dr Phelps that the 'whole atmosphere of Collins's Ode is similar to that of the Elegy. Cf. especially stanza 10,

''And hamlets brown, and dim-discovered spires,
And hears their simple bell, and marks o'er all
Thy dewy fingers draw
The gradual dusky veil.'' '
Dr Phelps notes also that Joseph Warton's verses contain some of Gray's pictures, and something of the same train of thought: e.g.:
''Hail, meek-eyed maiden, clad in sober grey,
Whose soft approach the weary woodman loves,
As homeward bent to kiss his prattling babes
Jocund he whistles through the twilight groves.''
add:
''Now every Passion sleeps; desponding Love,
And pining Envy, ever-restless Pride;
A holy calm creeps o'er my peaceful soul,
Anger and mad Ambition's storms subside.''
The latter stanza might well be the form in embryo of the four rejected stanzas quoted infra, n. on . Dr Phelps remarks that ''the scenery as well as the meditations of the Elegy were by no means original: they simply established more firmly literary fashions which were already becoming familiar.''
And certainly if the opening stanzas of the Elegy as we now have them were written as early as 1742, their composition was in no way affected by the poems of Warton and Collins; the same must be said even if the 'autumnal verses' of the letter of Sept. 11, 1746, were the Elegy. The spirit of gentle melancholy was in the air; and in 1746 and 1747 found in three young poets, Collins, Joseph Warton and Thomas Warton, that voice to the world at large which is found again in Gray in 1750. For in 1747 Thomas Warton published anonymously these lines, which he had written in his 17th year (1745):
''Beneath yon ruin'd abbey's moss-grown pile
Oft let me sit, at twilight hour of eve
Where thro' some western window the pale moon
Pours her long-levell'd rule of streaming light;
While sullen sacred silence reigns around,
Save the lone screech-owl's note, who builds his bow'r
Amid the mould'ring caverns dark and damp,
Or the calm breeze, that rustles in the leaves
Of flaunting ivy, that with mantle green
Invests some wasted tow'r:
''
where resemblance to the Elegy is closest of all.
Between these three poets communication of ideas was probable; but at this date even Thomas Warton, with whom he afterwards corresponded, was an absolute stranger to Gray. And Gray is so far from feeling that in any of these there were 'kindred spirits' who might 'enquire his fate' that he writes, Dec. 27, 1746:
'Have you seen the Works of two young Authors, a Mr Warton and a Mr Collins, both Writers of Odes? it is odd enough, but each is the half of a considerable Man, and one the counterpart of the other. The first has but little invention, very poetical choice of Expression, and a good Ear, the second a fine fancy, model'd upon the Antique, a bad Ear, great variety of Words, and Images with no choice at all. They both deserve to last some Years, but will not.'
So little are men conscious of that 'stream of tendency' on which they themselves are borne."


The boys break off to either side at the front of the church.

"The most striking parallel with this stanza occurs in Thomas Warton's Five Pastoral Eclogues (1745) ii 20-3, 28-36: 'Then let me walk the twilight meadows green, / Or breezy up-lands, near thick-branching elms, / While the still landscape sooths my soul to rest, / And every care subsides to calmest peace / ... / The solitude that all around becalms / The peaceful air, conspire[s] to wrap my soul / In musings mild, and nought the solemn scene / And the still silence breaks; but distant sounds / Of bleating flocks, that to their destin'd fold / The shepherd drives; mean-time the shrill-tun'd bell / Of some lone ewe that wanders from the rest, / Tinkles far off, with solitary sound; / The lowing cows ...' In ll. 47-8 a 'weary reaper' appears: 'along the vale, / Whistling he home returns to kiss his babes' (see l. 24 below). The 'silence ... save where' formula , in this stanza and the passage from Warton above, had become relatively common in descriptions of evening by the 1740s: e.g. Akenside, Ode to Sleep (1744) 18-20: 'No wakeful sound the moonlight valley knows, / Save where the brook its liquid murmur pours, / And lulls the waving scene to more profound repose'; Collins, Ode to Evening 9-12; and T. Warton Senior, Poems (1748) p. 117: 'Here what a solemn Silence reigns, / Save the Tinklings of a Rill.' Further examples are given in ll. 9-12n below."

Thebagpipes cease and the headmaster, MR.

"The most striking parallel with this stanza occurs in Thomas Warton's Five Pastoral Eclogues (1745) ii 20-3, 28-36: 'Then let me walk the twilight meadows green, / Or breezy up-lands, near thick-branching elms, / While the still landscape sooths my soul to rest, / And every care subsides to calmest peace / ... / The solitude that all around becalms / The peaceful air, conspire[s] to wrap my soul / In musings mild, and nought the solemn scene / And the still silence breaks; but distant sounds / Of bleating flocks, that to their destin'd fold / The shepherd drives; mean-time the shrill-tun'd bell / Of some lone ewe that wanders from the rest, / Tinkles far off, with solitary sound; / The lowing cows ...' In ll. 47-8 a 'weary reaper' appears: 'along the vale, / Whistling he home returns to kiss his babes' (see l. 24 below). The 'silence ... save where' formula , in this stanza and the passage from Warton above, had become relatively common in descriptions of evening by the 1740s: e.g. Akenside, Ode to Sleep (1744) 18-20: 'No wakeful sound the moonlight valley knows, / Save where the brook its liquid murmur pours, / And lulls the waving scene to more profound repose'; Collins, Ode to Evening 9-12; and T. Warton Senior, Poems (1748) p. 117: 'Here what a solemn Silence reigns, / Save the Tinklings of a Rill.' Further examples are given in ll. 9-12n below."